Google just updated text messaging for Android, and it completely changed the way I text

 

Google just updated text messaging for Android, and it completely changed the way I text

So I was pretty excited to hear that Messages for Android now has its own web client, accessible from any web browser. It’s called Messages for web, naturally:

Messages for Web (Messages for Android)Google

In short, Messages for web lets Android users text message seamlessly from any computer with a web browser. It’s super easy to set up, and even syncs in real time between phone and computer.

I’ve been using it for nearly a week at this point, and it’s fundamentally changed how I communicate.

Here’s why:

First, setting it up: It’s a snap!


Ben Gilbert / Business Insider / Google

Here’s how you set up Android text messaging on the web:

Step 1: Open Messages on your (Android) phone.
Step 2: Tap the three dots in the upper right corner, and select “Messages for web.”
Step 3: Navigate to the Messages for website on your favorite web browser.
Step 4: Scan the QR code using your phone.

And you’re in.

If you want the computer you’re using to remember your phone, there’s an option to select that from the web browser window.

If you’re not seeing the Messages for web option in Messages just yet, check back in a few days — Google is rolling out the update over time.

I’ve stopped knee-jerk responding to every text message buzz in my pocket.

I’ve begun ignoring the buzzes in my pocket, and it’s been a massive relief.

As someone who spends most of my time at a computer, I feel especially silly holding up a smartphone screen in front of that computer.

Eventually, I click over to the Messages for web tab in my browser and see what I’ve been missing: group texts with friends to get back to, messages from my partner, an alert from Verizon that my autopay went through successfully.

Important stuff, no doubt, but stuff that doesn’t require an immediate, “Stop everything!” response. Instead, I ignore the buzzes, find a natural end point to whatever I’m doing, then catch up on messages I’ve been missing.

It’s a subtle change with massive implications — I’ve been knee-jerk responding to text message pocket vibrations for over 10 years now.

But there’s something about having all my text messages in a browser window, waiting for me, that changed how I look at them: They’re just instant message windows now, nothing more than the AOL Instant Messengers and Facebook Messengers of the world.

It’s obvious, I realize. They’re all just messaging software in the broadest sense. But text messages have maintained the top spot in my personal hierarchy of prioritization. Messages for web is helping me put the space between myself and text messages that I didn’t even realize I needed.

Not having to switch between phone and computer while working is a huge time saver.

Not having to switch between phone and computer while working is a huge time saver.
Since I write about technology at a major publication in 2018, I use a MacBook Air with my phone sitting next to it. I don’t wear a name tag.
 Jacques Brinon/AP Images

Switching between a phone and a keyboard is massively disruptive. Moreover, as stated previously, it makes me feel ridiculous to pick up a smartphone solely for one type of messaging while I’m sitting at a powerful computer.

Having Messages for web makes text message communication a part of my workflow.

I’m free to ignore the buzzes in my pocket specifically because I know the messages they represent are easily tackled in a browser tab. Why bother looking?

Messages for web seamlessly syncs between phone and computer, instantly.

Ben Gilbert / Business Insider / Google

The way that Messages for Android works is identical to the way Messages for web works. You can send images, and emoji, and links, and GIFs, and there are even a handful of silly secret commands.

If someone sends you media, you can download it locally to your computer (and vice versa — it’s super easy to send your friends all the dumb GIFs you found before they woke up).

Messages for web works exactly as well as Google’s many other excellent services, like Google Docs, Calendar, Mail, and Keep. It is genuinely impressive how quick and easy it is to use Messages for web.

And yes, you can text message anyone with Messages for web, just like you would with your phone normally. It actually uses your phone to send the messages — there’s no way to use Messages for web without your phone close by.

Samsung is working on a phone design that would finally be more exciting than any iPhone

5 Reasons Your Business Needs HTTPS

ssl

5 Reasons Your Business Needs HTTPS

The rules have changed about what good website security means—starting with a new minimum requirement for all website pages to support encrypted connections. The good news is you’ll gain other valuable benefits by adhering to this new standard. First, let’s get on the same page by reviewing a few basics.

What’s HTTPS?

When your customers land on a web page that’s not protected by any type of SSL Certificate they’ll see http:// at the beginning of the website address in the browser bar. This used to be perfectly fine unless your webpage involved a login ID, password, form or payments. Enter the era of mega cybercrime.

HTTP has one glaring flaw—it’s not secure. Any information transmitted via an HTTP connection is vulnerable to being tampered with, misused or stolen. Your visitors deserve to know any data they share with you is safe from prying eyes.

Installing an SSL Certificate changes the browser bar address to https:// to clearly show visitors the connection is encrypted, meaning the server is authenticated and data is protected in transit. No wonder web browsers have made HTTPS the new standard for website security.

HTTPS Is Good for Your Bottom Line

Enabling encrypted connections is one great reason to protect your website with an SSL Certificate.  But, it’s not the only reason. Here are some other ways HTTPS brings value to your business:

  1. Speeds Up Performance—Being the slow kid on the block and the last one picked for dodgeball is a bummer. Being slow online could cost you everything. HTTP is being replaced by a newer faster version—HTTP/2. Encrypted connections are required to unlock the latest speed and security features.
  2. Increases Search Engine Traffic—Google includes SSL as a ranking factor. How’d you like to boost your search visibility up to 5%? Be found above the competition by encrypting every page of your website.
  3. Enables Mobile Options—Salesforce reports 71% of marketers believe mobile is core to their business. Mobile’s most popular features—geolocation, motion orientation, microphone, fullscreen and camera access—require HTTPS to be enabled by most browsers
  4. Protects Your Brand Reputation—A recent CA Security Council Report shows a mere 2% of customers would proceed past the “Not Secure” warnings that are due to kick in July 1 for all web pages without HTTPS connections. Show visitors your brand values their security by protecting your website with an SSL Certificate.
  5. Delivers a Seamless Experience—Don’t let visitors engage with several pages on your site only to be get broadsided with a “Not Secure” warning on pages you haven’t protected. They’ll reward you for taking the extra steps to give them an end-to-end encrypted experience.

 

Identity Validation Matters, Too

HTTPS is no longer optional if you want to build relationships and a business online. The good news it adds a lot of value to your business. But, SSL Certificates do more than enable HTTPS.
They also authenticate or validate your identity so visitors know it’s really you on the other end of their connection. We’re here to help you find the right level of validation based on your goals.

Click here to learn more and request pricing for the purchase and installation of your SSL Certificate.

HP goes up against the iPad Pro with its $599 Chromebook x2

HP goes up against the iPad Pro with its $599 Chromebook x2

Image: HP

Two weeks ago, Acer announced the first tablet running Chrome OS. And today, HP is announcing the second — and it’s a lot higher end.

It’s called the Chromebook x2, and it’s very much designed to go after the iPad Pro. It has a 12.3-inch screen (the larger iPad Pro has a 12.9-inch screen), docks with a keyboard cover, and supports stylus input.

The big benefit here is that the full package is available for much, much cheaper: the Chromebook x2 costs $599 in its base configuration and comes bundled with the keyboard cover and stylus. The iPad starts at $649 for the (smaller) tablet on its own, and you’ll have to spend $1,067 if you want the 12.9-inch model with a keyboard and pen. So if you’re thinking about using a tablet (with a non-traditional operating system) as a portable computer, HP will get you there for way cheaper.

In a briefing, HP also emphasized that the keyboard was designed to hold firmly enough to the tablet that it should feel like a clamshell laptop when the two are connected. I haven’t seen the Chromebook x2 in person, but HP’s images make it look relatively nice — like a combination of Google’s Pixelbook, with its metal and glossy white top, and Microsoft’s Surface Laptop, with its soft and colorful keyboard.

The Chromebook x2 seems to have a lot of potential, but there are some big questions — and not just around whether the hardware is as good as it looks. The real open question is whether Chrome OS is cut out to work on a tablet. Google has been overhauling the operating system to work better with touchscreens for a couple years now, but it’s still very much a desktop system (it’s based around the Chrome desktop browser and its display of desktop websites, after all). That’s likely to limit how useful it is, especially in comparison to an iPad, which was designed for touch from the ground up.

And while the Chromebook x2 looks like a bargain compared to the iPad, it’s expensive for a Chromebook, which people often buy for around $300. At $600, you enter into the world of lower-cost Windows computers, which this product will have to compete with, too.

HP plans to launch the Chromebook x2 sometime in June. And from the looks of it, we could see a few more Chrome OS tablets before then.

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