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How Real-Time Translation on Google Pixel Buds Works

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Credit: GoogleCredit: Google

The Pixel Buds offer instant access to Google assistant and offer 5 hours of battery life, but the most intriguing feature is the eal-time translation of 40 different languages. With the feature, you’ll be able to speak to someone in a different language and rely on Google’s Translate to help you get the job done. But as Google’s own support page, and those who have tried out the feature, can attest, it’ll take some legwork to make it happen.

Here’s how to make Google’s real-time translation work with Pixel Buds:

For one thing, you’re going to need a first-generation Pixel or a Pixel 2 phone. All other handsets won’t allow for the real-time translation Google offers with its own line of smartphones. Additionally, you’ll need to have the Google Translate app running on your smartphone.

MORE: Best Smartphones on the Market Now

Now that you’re ready with the correct hardware, you’ll need to activate Google Assistant from the Pixel Buds by pressing the right earbud and saying, “OK, Google, help me speak” followed by the language of your choice. You’ll notice on your phone that Google Translate is now up and ready to help you translate.

If you’re speaking English and the other person is speaking another language, you’ll need to have that person speak into your Pixel or Pixel 2 phone. With Google Translate activated, the other person will speak through the Pixel phone in her or her language and you’ll be talking through the earbuds. Along the way, Google Translate is translating what you’re saying on the fly to each other.

The Google translation feature comes free, as well as Google Translate. But to get it up and running, you’ll need to be living in Google’s ecosystem.

by DON REISINGER 

“Google’s Pixel buds translation will change the world.”

EU to Declare Cyber-Attacks “Act of War” – USA Likely to Follow 

European Union member states have drafted a diplomatic document which states serious cyber-attacks by a foreign nation could be construed as an act of war.

The document developed as a deterrent to provocations by nation states like Russia and North Korea, will declare that member states may respond to online attacks with conventional weapons “in the gravest circumstances.”

This framework on a joint EU diplomatic response to malicious cyber activities would seem to raise the stakes significantly on state-sponsored attacks, especially those focused on critical infrastructure.

UK security minister Ben Wallace claimed last week that the UK government is “as sure as possible” that North Korea was behind the WannaCry ransomware attacks in May that crippled over a third of NHS England, forcing the cancellation of thousands of operations and appointments.

The problem is that definitive attribution in cyberspace is very difficult, making the framework appear largely symbolic.

It brings the EU in line with NATO policy in the past, establishing cyber as a legitimate military domain, meaning an online attack could theoretically trigger Article 5, the part of its treaty related to collective defense, which states that an attack on one member is an attack on all 29 allies.

McAfee chief scientist, Raj Samani, claimed the move was unsurprising considering WannaCry and the likely state-backed attacks on French and German elections.

“While it is important to define cyber-attacks that are used for espionage or disruption as they would be when committed by physical actors, the greatest challenge that countries have will be in identifying and proving that the malicious actors that caused the cyber-attack have direct links to governmental organizations – something that these groups will be even more keen to conceal going forward,” he added.”

I’m expecting the USA to follow with a similar statement, to function as an additional deterrent against the recent spate of Russian and North Korean incursions.

The vast majority of Russia’s attacks start with social engineering and spear phishing attacks. However, current investigations show that they also have been running paid propaganda campaigns through Facebook.

Full blog post with links to sources:
https://blog.knowbe4.com/eu-to-declare-cyber-attacks-act-of-war.-usa-likely-to-follow

2018 Is Likely to Be a Worse Year for Ransomware Than 2017

Sophos released their 2018 malware forecast this week. Their predictions would make any IT Pro concerned, link to a PDF of their report below. Read on for your executive summary.

Ransomware Mutations Running Amok

You have seen a lot in this blog this year about the WannaCry and NotPetya ransomware strains. Both attacks exploited the EternalBlue Windows SMB vulnerability, and both did not have workable decryption mechanisms for the few organizations desperate enough to try to pay the ransom.

Both incidents make one thing clear: WannaCry and NotPetya appear to be the work of military cyber warfare divisions. Their authors aren’t script kiddies, but professional Dev teams using sophisticated techniques. Nation states are fighting a cold cyber war, and both commercial and non-profit organizations are the collateral damage worldwide.

RaaS Is for Newbie Cyber Crims

There is an area where amateur cyber “crims” do come in, and that’s Ransomware as a Service, aka RaaS. Newbies without l33t skills simply buy the code on the dark web including easy how-to videos.

Sophos says that RaaS is growing in popularity on the Dark Web, and this year’s Cerber ransomware is their example of a worrisome trend. Here’s some of what it says in the report that specifically pertains to RaaS:

“Ransomware is big business on the Dark Web. Its creators realized they could make more money not just by extorting currency from their victims, but by selling kits buyers could use to make and distribute their own. We’ve seen a number of different services and pricing models in the past year, and expect to see many more in 2018.

One of the biggest examples, as mentioned above, is Cerber. Other examples include Satan, malicious software that once opened in a Windows system, encrypts all the files and demands a ransom for the decryption tools, and Philadelphia. The latter was notable for its marketing technique, which included a slick YouTube video advertisement on the open web.”

New “Marketing” Techniques

Sophos reports on an additional ransomware trend they found in a malware strain called Spora. Instead of demanding one ransom to decrypt an entire encrypted drive or partition, some ransomware offers victims multiple options. The options seen in Spora are:

  • Decrypt two files for nothing
  • Decrypt a selection of files for 30.00 dollars
  • Have the ransomware itself removed for 20.00 dollars
  • Buy what they call immunity for 50.00 dollars
  • Get everything on the computer restored for 120.00 dollars

Ransomware Is Now Targeting Non-Win OSen

September 2013 was when CryptoLocker reared its ugly head as the first weapons-grade ransomware that exclusively targeted Windows, which remains Target No. 1.

But Sophos notices a trend of ransomware targeting non-Windows operating systems. I would not be surprised if in 2018 a worldwide MacOS or Linux distro ransomware pandemic broke out.

Ransomware is also growing rapidly on Android. Sophos reported that the prevalence of Android ransomware has grown almost every month in 2017; 30.4% of the Android malware researched in September 2017 by Sophos was ransomware, and they expect that 45% of all Android malware in October was ransomware.

One of the biggest Android ransomware stories broke this October: DoubleLocker. Looks like Android ransomware is going to be a bigger problem in 2018.

Healthcare Continues to Be a Target.

Many cyber criminals are specifically targeting the healthcare industry. Sophos states this trend started in 2016. Healthcare is the single most targeted industry because they are the victims who are most likely to pay ransoms. The Sophos report shows that critical infrastructure, education and small businesses also are often targeted for ransomware attacks, as they’re more likely to pay up as well.

Between April 1st and October 3rd, Sophos notes that the top four countries for ransomware victims are the United States (17.2%), Great Britain (11.1%), Belgium (8.6%), and Singapore (6.5%.) And of course neither Ukraine or Russia even show up in the Top 16, because that’s where these organized cyber crime gangs are, and they know that FSB (KGB) swat teams will knock down their doors if they target these countries.

ZDNet also has predictions about the nasty future of ransomware with four ways the nightmare is about to get even worse:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-nasty-future-of-ransomware-four-ways-the-nightmare-is-about-to-get-even-worse/

From the Cyberheist News blog.

After quietly infecting a million devices, Reaper botnet set to be worse than Mirai

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Reaper is on track to become one of the largest botnets recorded in recent years — and yet nobody seems to know what it will do or when. But researchers say the damage could be bigger than last year’s cyberattack.

(Image: file photo)

A little over a month ago, a sizable botnet of infected Internet of Things devices began appearing on the radar of security researchers.

Now, just weeks later, it’s on track to become one of the largest botnets recorded in recent years.

The botnet, dubbed “Reaper” by researchers at Netlab 360, is said to have ensnared almost two million internet-connected webcams, security cameras, and digital video recorders (DVRs) in the past month, says Check Point, which also published research, putting its growth at a far faster pace than Mirai.

It was Mirai that caused a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack last October, knocking popular websites off the internet for millions of users. The collective bandwidth from the huge number of “zombie devices” that were infected and enslaved was directed at Dyn, an internet infrastructure company, which overloaded the company’s systems and prevented millions from accessing popular websites.

Mirai was “beautifully simple,” said Ken Munro, a consultant at UK-based security firm Pen Test Partners. The malware would scan the internet and infect connected devices with default usernames and passwords, which either weren’t or couldn’t be changed by the owner.

 Reaper, however, “is what Mirai could easily have been,” said Munro. It takes a slightly different, more advanced approach by quietly targeting and exploiting known vulnerabilities in devices and injecting its malicious code, effectively hijacking the device for whenever the botnet controller is ready to issue their commands. Each time a device is infected, the device spreads the malware to other vulnerable devices — like a worm.

Mirai aggressively ran each device against a list of known usernames and passwords, but Reaper is “not very aggressive,” said Netlab.

By targeting a known vulnerability, the botnet can swiftly take control of a device without raising any alarms.

“One of the reasons Mirai didn’t achieve its full potential is that the compromise didn’t persist beyond a reboot,” said Munro. “Hence, multiple botnet herders were competing for control of the compromised DVRs that comprised it, so the huge botnet it could have been was never built,” he said.

Netlab said at the time of publishing their research that the botnet was infecting nine known vulnerabilities in D-Link, Netgear, and AVTech products, as well as other device makers.

Not only has the botnet gained in size in the past month — it’s growing in capability. New exploits have been added to the botnet’s arsenal regularly in recent days, said Netlab. Check Point said 33 devices are vulnerable to attack so far. Researchers have also noted that several known, easy-to-exploit vulnerabilities have not been added to the botnet, raising questions about why some exploits have been added and not others.

But what’s thrown researchers is that nobody can figure out what the botnet is for.

While the Mirai botnet was a point-and-shoot botnet that could be used to hose systems with vast amounts of bandwidth, Reaper can be used to run complex attack scripts on infected devices. Reaper’s command and control infrastructure is also growing in size, accommodating more infected devices by the day. Netlab said 10,000 bots were under the wing of just one command and control server.

So far, there haven’t been any signs of DDoS attacks yet. The botnet creator (“it appears that one group or individual has control of most of it,” said Munro), is focusing on building the botnet’s size. As it stands, Reaper’s size today could be capable of “creating significantly more DDoS traffic than Mirai,” said Munro.

It’s not the first time botnets of a massive scale have crept up on security researchers.

Earlier this year, a 300,000-strong botnet appeared almost out of nowhere, but researchers couldn’t figure out what it did — if anything.

A breakdown of the Reaper botnet shows that the malware that infects devices allows the botnet owner to remotely execute code on each device, said Alan Woodward, a professor at the University of Surrey. But because each device has such little individual computational power, the code running on each device would have to be harnessed collectively for a larger, coordinated computing task, he said.

That could be anything from a DDoS on an internet target, to a much larger kind of attack.

“The aggregation of large numbers of the same Internet of Things (IoT) device leads to systemic issues,” said Munro. “When it’s one device affecting one home, it’s irritating for the consumer, but when it’s a million devices, deeper problems arise.”

“For example, any IoT device that switches a lot of electrical power gives rise to potential to affect the electricity grid,” he said.

“Whether it’s a smart kettle, a smart thermostat switching your air conditioning or solar panels — all switch power,” he said. “Trigger a million devices that switch 3kW concurrently and the power grid fails.”

What happens next is anybody’s guess.

“Everyone is expecting it to pounce, but so far nothing,” said Woodward. There isn’t much that consumers or device owners can do, except patch any affected devices they may own and carry out a factory reset.

Given that device owners are at the mercy of the manufacturers to release patches — many of which haven’t learned much from the Mirai attack and still don’t take security seriously — many may find that simply pulling the plug on each and every affected device might be the only way to dismantle the botnet.

With enough amassed firepower to be larger and stronger than Mirai, the question isn’t necessarily what the botnet will do.

“The question is whether it gets used in anger,” said Munro.

Who’s watching you?

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Sometimes we don’t realize and then don’t remember whom we’ve given access to our Google account in order to set up an account from another vendor.

It’s always a good idea to go to https://myaccount.google.com/permissions while you’re logged in to your Google account and review who has access to your private information.

If you use an Android based phone be careful not to remove access to important apps and make sure you do for the questionable ones.  Not sure about an app?  Google it and see.